Kiwis ditch cash, embrace digital payments

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Kiwis ditch cash, embrace digital payments
February 10, 2016 3PM Catherine Knowles

Kiwis around the country are embracing digital payments, according to new research from MasterCard. In fact, 49% of New Zealanders expect we will not be using cash in ten years’ time, with mobile devices, biometrics and wearables becoming the norm, the research shows.

“New Zealanders are early adopters of technology and are increasingly seeking fast, convenient and secure ways to pay. Retailers who are offering new technologies such as contactless payments are finding it a fast, reliable and easy way for customers to pay and provides a positive customer experience,” says Peter Chisnall, MasterCard New Zealand country manager.

He says, “MasterCard encourages retailers to ensure their terminals are enabled to accept contactless payments because this technology not only supports the use of contactless cards, but opens the door to emerging payment technologies, such as mobile payments.”

The research shows transactions made with cash will continue to decrease, with 36% of consumers saying they could live without cash and only use emerging payment technologies in just a few years’ time. On top of this, 41% of people say they would already consider using contactless technology on their smartphone.

When asked about new payment technologies, 44% think mobile payments will be the next thing to take off in New Zealand. This was followed by biometrics/facial recognition/fingerprints (21%) and wearable technology including smartwatches (18%).

Safety and speed are not just important for consumers shopping in store but also online. Security remains the biggest concern when shopping online (49% stated this was their top concern), ensuring you are dealing with a legitimate business (35%) and whether the quality will be as described/expected (34%).

Interestingly, concern about online security of personal and banking details has decreased in this years’ survey as Kiwis become more comfortable and confident to conduct more personal business online, with 66% of New Zealanders making purchases online at least once a month, according to the research.

The survey found the biggest concern with shopping online is the security of banking and personal details (49% top concern), down from 60% in 2015, as people become more confident with online shopping.

“It is natural that safety is a primary concern when transacting online. Using a trusted digital platform […] allows consumers to use any payment card or enabled device to go beyond plastic and discover enhanced shopping experiences that are as simple as a click, tap or touch – online, in-store or anywhere,” Chisnall says.

 

Originally posted:https://netguide.co.nz/story/kiwis-ditch-cash-embrace-digital-payments/

 

Adjusting Your Strategies to Google’s Encrypted Searches

3 Oct 2013 – Adrienne Erin – Featured –

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When Google completely cut off keyword data at the end of September, it may have seemed out of the blue, but the first encrypted searches appeared as far back as 2011 and many believe that the events prompting this change date back even further.

Regardless of the causes, Google has delivered another major blow to marketers following the recent implementation of the new Gmail tabs.

On Sept. 24th, Rand Fishkin of Moz said in his special Whiteboard Tuesday that he believed about 75% of Google’s searches were encrypted and predicted that 100% of keywords would soon be hidden. For marketers this change means new challenges as they try to determine how to navigate keyword research without referral data.

While it’s scary to think about how to work around this major change, let’s break it down to see how you can rise above encrypted searches and maybe even use the change to your advantage.

What Are Encrypted Google Searches?

Encrypted searches use HTTPS, meaning keyword data won’t be revealed to site owners. These types of searches won’t allow Internet marketers and site owners to track users’ keyword searches anymore; web analytics software was previously used to break down users and their keywords searches, but this tactic will no longer be possible.

The reality is that even if you can still see some keyword data, eventually 100% of your referrals will probably result in the keyword not being provided. Keyword data will be gone. Google has removed the ability to view what a user searched for before visiting your site.

Why Keyword Referral Data Is Important

A lot of marketers use this keyword data for tasks that not only improve their own page ranking, but to better the web as a whole. Keyword data can help our ranking efforts and our ability to effectively serve our customers. If you notice a keyword is getting a lot of search traffic, but the page still has a low rank, you realize you’ll have to brainstorm ways to make the page rank higher. And if a search term is sending a lot of people to a specific page, but your conversion rate is low, you know you need to improve the page.

Keyword data is also important when examining how users view our brand and content. Looking at users’ searches allowed us to get inside our customers’ minds in regards to specific products or content; however, this task just became more complex without keyword data.

As for marketing opportunities, keyword data was previously a goldmine. We could figure out ways to optimize for keyword phrases that didn’t have a high rank. There were ways to confront and improve low-ranking keyword phrases – now we’ll have to find another way.

Adjust Your Strategies

This change is undoubtedly going to make our job as marketers more difficult, but don’t get angry about it; instead, look for ways to adjust your strategies. A lot of brainstorming and conversations need to happen in order to figure out where to go from here, but here are a few basic ideas to get you started:

  • Start looking at page level data. When you can’t see the keyword data anymore, how are you supposed to improve a page’s ranking? Try using the connection of various sources of data, as the Moz blog explains. Which pages on your site are getting search visits? Start looking at page-level data instead of keyword-level data.
  • Organize your search terms into categories. You can track your rankings based on multiple different categories to see which one is improving your ranking. For instance, organize your terms by head terms, long-tail, branded phrases, non-branded terms and more. Then you can examine the pages with search traffic from each category to see how successful they are.
  • Use other sources to analyze perceptions of your brand. You could try keyword suggestion sources like SEMRush or Google Suggest to view the keyword expansions associated with your brand and content. Another easy tactic is looking at what people are typing in your internal site search bar, giving you insight into how customers view your brand.
  • Target specific keywords with AdWords campaigns. Unfortunately, this may be what Google is aiming at by using encrypted searches. Running Adwords campaigns may be expensive, but they will allow you to view expansion opportunities, see where you’re missing organic traffic and possibly bid on certain keywords.

Use This Change to Your Advantage

It’ll take time for Internet marketers to adjust to this change and find ways around the lack of keyword data from Google. Bing will still send keyword data, even though it’s not as widely-used as Google. It’s important to remain optimistic and use this change to your advantage.

If you have clients for whom you do SEO, use this as an opportunity to start conversations with them. They may be uneasy and confused, so they’ll be looking to you for solutions. This is a great time to step up your efforts and use your knowledge to continue pleasing your clients.

Take this as an opportunity to start reading and learning more. There’s never been a better time to refresh your practices and learn from the industry around you. Every marketer will be dealing with this problem, so you’re not alone. Stay current with conversations and learn from others in your niche.

Encrypted Google searches definitely change the way Internet marketers will perform their job. What are your ideas on how to circumvent the loss of keyword data? Have you found any useful workaround articles? Please share in the comments!

Social Media is Key to B2B Content Marketing

31 Jul 2013 – Pam Dyer – Featured –

B2B Marketing

91% of B2B marketers now use social media as a content marketing tool.

 

Social media is key to b2b content marketing Social Media is Key to B2B Content Marketing, B2B marketers are distributing their content on social networks more than ever before.

A recent study conducted by the Content Marketing Institute and Marketing Profs confirms that content marketing remains a top priority for B2B marketers, with the vast majority leveraging the practice as part of their marketing strategy. But many are uncertain about how to successfully employ the many tactics available to them.

 

Content marketing is the art of communicating with your customers and prospects without selling. It is non-interruptive — instead of directly advertising your products or services, you are communicating with your target audience by sharing valuable, free information. The core of this content strategy is the belief that buyers will be driven to do business with you if you provide valuable information to them on an ongoing basis.

 

If you have a website, a blog, or maintain a presence on Facebook, Twitter, or other social networks, you are a publisher. You need to think like one, and build a digital content marketing strategy that leverages what you create — blog posts, website articles, images, and multimedia like videos, slideshows, and infographics — to enhance consumer engagement and conversion rates.

Here are some interesting statistics from the 2013 B2B Content Marketing Benchmarks, Budgets and Trends – North America:
More B2B marketers are using content marketing to achieve organizational goals:

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Brand awareness, customer acquisition, and lead generation are the top B2B content marketing goals:

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87% of B2B marketers use social media to distribute content — it is now the most popular content marketing tactic:

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B2B marketers are using an average of 5 social distribution channels.

LinkedIn is the top social network when it comes to B2B content marketing. It’s interesting to note that Pinterest is now being used by more than 25% of B2B marketers — read 18 Tips for Optimizing Your Pinterest Images to Improve SEO to learn how to get positive results and drive traffic with the visual social network.

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63% of B2B content marketers say that producing enough content is now their biggest challenge:

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Google Analytics Adds Powerful New Filters

20 Jun 2013 – Tina Courtney-Brown – Featured –

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For the legions of fans who use it, Google Analytics is an indispensable tool that allows site owners to segment their audience in a granular fashion, learning what works best for each slice. Data can be segmented in a multitude of ways, from geo-targeted traits to specific applications, screens, and custom dimensions.

It’s common sense that aggregate data is meaningless in its raw form; to find the value, you must see the stories that the data is attempting to tell. Thanks to recent filter additions and updates, Google Analytics now gives site owners the ability to slice and dice their audience metrics all the more. The more you fully grasp how, when, where, and why your users are engaging with your content, the more you can grow your business and give the people what they want. Take a little time to get up to speed on the new Google Analytics features and amp up your site-building know-how.

 

General Instructions on How to Use Google Analytics

In order to unleash the power of this free tool, you’ll first need to set up the service on any site you manage. To do so, set up an account specifically for the site you wish to track, and paste the generated commands into your site’s code. Then re-access the Google Analytics dashboard, and from then on, traffic data will be tracked.

Your main dashboard shows a summary of the data trafficked via your site. This dashboard is fully customizable, so as you browse around the various report types, just hit the “Add to Dashboard” option for any data you’d like to see on your main analytics page. Go deeper into the metrics by clicking “View Report” for any particular data segment, or adjust your date range to compare results for specific chunks of time. Reports are all shareable, and can be imported into visual charts and graphs, so you can layout the data in a manner that best suits your comprehension needs.

 

Let’s Get Granular

Google Analytics recently beefed-up their filter offerings, giving a higher level of granularity to many of their metrics. This empowers site owners and marketers all the more, because to truly see the success of your inbound marketing strategies, you must analyze segments of data to see where there are strengths and weaknesses. You’ll also want to divide these site segments into meaningful groups, based on certain demographic parameters. This will aid you in fully grasping the behaviors of your audience.

The new filter additions allow site owners to segment their audience to even more micromanaging degrees. Keep in mind that these changes only impact the actual filters, and not advanced segments. Filters and advanced segments are two separate ways to look at data in Google Analytics. Filters work on the profile level, so when a filter is activated, Analytics won’t gather any visitor data if they do not match. Advanced segments, however, collects all data, and then data is included or excluded once a report is generated.

 

Big News for Mobile Developers

There are many new ways to filter profiles. The old set-up grouped all aspects of “Mobile” users into one segment, but the new filters let us go a bit more hog wild.

The following fields are now available for segmenting:

  • Is a mobile device and “Is a tablet” – these now let users distinguish between screen sizes.
  • Mobile brand name – gives the ability to search by mobile brands like HTC, Samsung, etc. Devices may also be branded by their carriers, like Apple or Verizon.
  • Mobile model name – now marketers can understand specific behaviors based on the exact phone users are on, like iPhone versions and HTC Evo versus Samsung Epic, etc.
  • Mobile marketing name – some phones have different marketing names versus their actual hardware names. As an example, the Galaxy S3 is the marketing name of a device that has two totally separate models.
  • Mobile pointing method – some phones come equipped with an actual physical keyboard, so this filter lets you see users accessing keyboards versus the onscreen keyboard.
    Mobile has QWERTY keyboard? – this answers the question of whether or not the device has a physical keyboard.
  • Mobile is NFC supported? – differentiates between phones that have NFC, or “Near Field Communication”, and those that don’t.
  • Mobile has cellular radio? and “Mobile has Wi-Fi?”- same as above, for their respective technologies.

It’s no longer necessary for marketers to know the nuances of the various mobile devices, as the analytics will highlight differences in technologies. For those developing and maintaining mobile apps, this level of granularity is a goldmine.

 

Additional New Filters

There are loads more new filters to play with outside of the mobile space.

Some highlights include:

Social filters

  • Social network – lists the social network where the highlighted event has occurred (Facebook, Google+, etc.)
  • Social action – outlines the specific social engagement that occurred during the event, which includes a Facebook Like, Google +1, etc.
  • Social action target – specifically names the content that triggered the social action above, such as the URL or text that was Liked.

Content & Traffic

  • Hit type – defines the type of hit that occurred, such as appview, page, transaction, social, event, etc.
  • Internal search term – shows the search terms used in the given property’s internal search engine.
  • Internal search type – displays searches that were specific to a category or area of a property (like “Menswear”)

Audience / Users

  • Browser size – reveals the pixel dimensions of the browser display.
  • IP version – shows the user’s IP version (IPV4, etc.)

E-commerce:

  • Local currency code – lists a currency code used for the given transaction.

Google Analytics Adds Powerful New Filters

24 May 2013 – Tina Courtney-Brown – Featured –

PoD_Google_Analytics2

For the legions of fans who use it, Google Analytics is an indispensable tool that allows site owners to segment their audience in a granular fashion, learning what works best for each slice. Data can be segmented in a multitude of ways, from geo-targeted traits to specific applications, screens, and custom dimensions.

It’s common sense that aggregate data is meaningless in its raw form; to find the value, you must see the stories that the data is attempting to tell. Thanks to recent filter additions and updates, Google Analytics now gives site owners the ability to slice and dice their audience metrics all the more. The more you fully grasp how, when, where, and why your users are engaging with your content, the more you can grow your business and give the people what they want. Take a little time to get up to speed on the new Google Analytics features and amp up your site-building know-how.

General Instructions on How to Use Google Analytics

In order to unleash the power of this free tool, you’ll first need to set up the service on any site you manage. To do so, set up an account specifically for the site you wish to track, and paste the generated commands into your site’s code. Then re-access the Google Analytics dashboard, and from then on, traffic data will be tracked.

Your main dashboard shows a summary of the data trafficked via your site. This dashboard is fully customizable, so as you browse around the various report types, just hit the “Add to Dashboard” option for any data you’d like to see on your main analytics page. Go deeper into the metrics by clicking “View Report” for any particular data segment, or adjust your date range to compare results for specific chunks of time. Reports are all shareable, and can be imported into visual charts and graphs, so you can layout the data in a manner that best suits your comprehension needs.

Let’s Get Granular

Google Analytics recently beefed-up their filter offerings, giving a higher level of granularity to many of their metrics. This empowers site owners and marketers all the more, because to truly see the success of your inbound marketing strategies, you must analyze segments of data to see where there are strengths and weaknesses. You’ll also want to divide these site segments into meaningful groups, based on certain demographic parameters. This will aid you in fully grasping the behaviors of your audience.

The new filter additions allow site owners to segment their audience to even more micromanaging degrees. Keep in mind that these changes only impact the actual filters, and not advanced segments. Filters and advanced segments are two separate ways to look at data in Google Analytics. Filters work on the profile level, so when a filter is activated, Analytics won’t gather any visitor data if they do not match. Advanced segments, however, collects all data, and then data is included or excluded once a report is generated.

Big News for Mobile Developers

There are many new ways to filter profiles. The old set-up grouped all aspects of “Mobile” users into one segment, but the new filters let us go a bit more hog wild.

The following fields are now available for segmenting:

  • Is a mobile device and “Is a tablet” – these now let users distinguish between screen sizes.
  • Mobile brand name – gives the ability to search by mobile brands like HTC, Samsung, etc. Devices may also be branded by their carriers, like Apple or Verizon.
  • Mobile model name – now marketers can understand specific behaviors based on the exact phone users are on, like iPhone versions and HTC Evo versus Samsung Epic, etc.
  • Mobile marketing name – some phones have different marketing names versus their actual hardware names. As an example, the Galaxy S3 is the marketing name of a device that has two totally separate models.
  • Mobile pointing method – some phones come equipped with an actual physical keyboard, so this filter lets you see users accessing keyboards versus the onscreen keyboard.
  • Mobile has QWERTY keyboard? – this answers the question of whether or not the device has a physical keyboard.
  • Mobile is NFC supported? – differentiates between phones that have NFC, or “Near Field Communication”, and those that don’t.
  • Mobile has cellular radio? and “Mobile has Wi-Fi?”- same as above, for their respective technologies.

It’s no longer necessary for marketers to know the nuances of the various mobile devices, as the analytics will highlight differences in technologies. For those developing and maintaining mobile apps, this level of granularity is a goldmine.

Additional New Filters

There are loads more new filters to play with outside of the mobile space.

Some highlights include:

Social filters

  • Social network – lists the social network where the highlighted event has occurred (Facebook, Google+, etc.)
  • Social action – outlines the specific social engagement that occurred during the event, which includes a Facebook Like, Google +1, etc.
  • Social action target – specifically names the content that triggered the social action above, such as the URL or text that was Liked.

Content & Traffic

  • Hit type – defines the type of hit that occurred, such as appview, page, transaction, social, event, etc.
  • Internal search term – shows the search terms used in the given property’s internal search engine.
  • Internal search type – displays searches that were specific to a category or area of a property (like “Menswear”)

Audience / Users

  • Browser size – reveals the pixel dimensions of the browser display.
    IP version – shows the user’s IP version (IPV4, etc.)
  • E-commerce:
  • Local currency code – lists a currency code used for the given transaction.

For more information on how to use every single filter available in Google Analytics (and there are oodles!), see the Google Analytics Documentation site. And enjoy the new power the additional filters bring to your marketing prowess!