Top 3 Most Popular Languages in Business


Top 3 Most Popular Languages in Business

Marina Ivanova – June 2017

Although it is difficult to predict the direct benefits of learning a second language, we do know that this skill will set you apart from your competition whether in the work force or while searching for a career. Here we have listed the top 3 most popular languages in Business right now, besides English, and in what industries they are most beneficial.

When doing business solely within the United States, it is important for companies to know how to communicate with the country as a whole. Given that Spanish is said to be the second most spoken language in America, it’s easily the best to learn for those looking to broaden their horizons within the United States. For this reason, getting a good job within any customer service-related industry is almost certainly tied to your ability to speak Spanish. It is estimated that the ability to speak Spanish could come with a wage increase of about 1.7%.

In addition to doing better business in the United States, Spanish could broaden horizons in countries like the ones throughout South America. With large self-sustaining environments, South America offers opportunities for a cheaper way to do business, and most of the population is Spanish-speaking.

There’s also Mexico, which is one of the top countries to think about investing in. It has a free market economy in the trillion-dollar class, and trading with the United States continues to increase.

As of this year, it is estimated that 400 million people around the world speak Spanish and 340 million speak English. Spanish is the official language of 21 countries and is spoken in 44 countries. Being able to communicate in Spanish fluently would be beneficial to communicating efficiently with cultures throughout the United States, but also in many countries around the world.

Mandarin Chinese
Surprise, surprise, the most widely spoken language on the plant is Chinese with over a billion numbers of speakers. Recent years have seen China grow to become one of the world’s largest trading nations. We have also seen the demand for Chinese-speaking business people grow.

Some of the most important and influential Chinese communities are in Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei, the Philippines, and Mongolia. Mandarin Chinese is spoken in all of these, so knowing how to converse with professionals in these places would give business people the advantage of tapping into vast markets and making a more personal connection with some of the most powerful economies.

Mandarin is the official and most widely spoken language within China, though there are also a number of other Chinese dialects that are also spoken within the country. Mandarin is one of the official languages of the United Nations.

It is important to note that many companies have long-terms investments in China, so business with international companies such as these would provide business for years to come. That being said, it may take a while to learn this complex language, but China is not going away as a powerful nation any time soon.

Arabic, one of the world’s oldest languages is spoken in the Middle East, with speakers found in countries such as Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Iraq, Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, and Egypt. So many people have a working knowledge of Arabic, in fact, that in 1974 it was made the sixth official language of the United Nations.

The use of the Internet is rising in popularity in the Middle East, and so it is becoming easier to do business there from anywhere else.

Other business owners agree that the Middle East is one of their biggest export markets. Some say the region makes up a quarter of their business overall. Because of the fast-growing market of eager consumers in the Middle East, businesses should consider making their products easily available to Arabic speakers, and enterprising business people should consider taking a few lessons.

There are about 406 million native speakers Arabic is the official language of roughly 27 different countries, and the Middle East is proving to be full of promises for businesses across the world.

The Networking Abyss

The Networking Abyss


By Chi Chi Okezie

As business entrepreneurs, working professionals or students, we understand the importance of networking. There are times when networking can get overwhelming, seem complicated and even a vast creature to handle. Do not give up so quickly. Take time to refocus, tr-energize and map out a successful networking game plan.

Listed below are strategic ways in which savvy networkers can find direction in a networking state of confusion or vast uncertainty.


Face to Face

In our business lives, we tend to hide behind the screens. Whether it is on our phone, our tablet or computer, we tend to miss out on face to face contact or human interactions. In order gain more clarity in your networking, sometimes it is better to meet face to face. Networking 1-on-1 is an excellent way of reconnecting, building strong relationships and growing trust. Not only does it add value to the relationship but it can also set a platform for accountability.



Another great way to get the most out of your networking is to reach out to your colleagues at certain touchpoints. Perhaps you ran across an interesting article, use that as a touchpoint to connect. You could have met someone new and can use that as an opportunity to make a introduction or referral to an existing contact in your network. Look for meaningful ways to re-engage and keep the communication flowing and relevant.

Hopefully these quick tips can help you navigate through networking dilemmas with success. Find the value in executing a networking plan which promotes trust and building relationships.

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Skills You Were Not Taught in School – Networking For Career Success

Skills You Were Not Taught in School – Networking For Career Success

By Michael M DeSafey

There are the technical skills you were taught in school: engineering, geology, environmental services. The science and methods (The why). As you start working in the industry though you need to gain more skills and experiences related to real life business activities.

As your career progresses you will earn professional registrations and most likely be promoted to the Project levels. Your responsibilities begin to increase and it’s up to you to meet the deadlines and prepare deliverables. You learn to write reports, interact with clients and manage project teams.

At first you will find it tough going, but with time and experience, it becomes like second nature. Because you know the why, and have learned the how.

One of the most difficult activities engineering and environmental professionals are tasked with is Business development; networking. You understand the technical aspects to your job; the science and engineering (the why), but the how (how to build relationships, how to establish clients, and how network with associates) is beyond your education. This is a skill you most definitely were not taught in school and need to develop as a professional to advance your career. But where do you start?

Here are some tips on how to network

  • It’s important to remember that no one ever died from networking (we checked).
  • Start out by attending an association luncheon. If you choose an event with a speaker or topic that you’re interested in you’ll have something to talk about during the networking session.
  • Bring cards and be prepared with your elevator speech. This is who you are, who you work for, and how your firm relates to the days topic, in 30 seconds. If your marketing department doesn’t have that message crafted, try Google.
  • Have a plan. If the event attendees aren’t listed online, show up to the event early and scan the name tags. Make a mental note of who you’d like to talk to.
  • If you recognize a name of someone you don’t know but would like to meet (a decision maker at a potential client firm, perhaps), hang out at the registration table and see who picks up that name tag.
  • As other attendees show up, it’s OK to make a beeline for a friendly face. Ask your friend to introduce you around. Caveat: don’t hang out with your friend for the entire networking session. Give her time to mingle on her own; make sure you mingle on your own as well.
  • The easiest way to find someone to talk to is locate a person standing by himself, wishing he were anywhere but there. Put your nerves aside, walk up, and say hi.
  • (Speaking of nerves, it’s perfectly normal to be nervous. Many seasoned business development professionals get butterflies before every networking event).
  • The best ice-breaker is to ask your new acquaintance about himself. People love to talk about themselves.
  • Ask open-ended questions. A yes-or-no question is a conversation killer. Lead him with questions that lead to more questions, but don’t interrogate him!
  • It’s OK, even preferable, to talk about topic other than business. Relationships are developed over time by getting to know someone as a person, instead of potential work.
  • Know when to move on. Don’t monopolize one person’s time, or let one person monopolize yours. Once you make an acquaintance, learn about him and exchange information, move on.
  • Make it your goal to meet at least three new people during the networking time. This will keep you moving around and maximize the use of your time.
  • When it’s time to be seated for lunch DO NOT sit with someone you’ve already talked to. This is the time to find one of the people you want to meet and find a seat at, or near, her table. Introduce yourself and chat for just a moment, with a promise to follow-up at a later time.
  • Once everyone is seated, pass a stack of your cards around the table. Everyone else should do the same. Then introduce yourself to the people on either side of you. Keep the conversation light. Now is not the time to set meetings or discuss projects.
  • Please, please, use common sense when making conversation! Politics, religion, sex, or anything controversial is off-limits.
  • Industry gossip, no matter how juicy, is also off-limits. You don’t know who knows who, and the very nature of gossip is negative. Don’t get drawn into it.
  • After the presentation is over, close the loop with your table mates and the other people you talked to. Everyone has to get back to work, so now is not the time to strike up an in-depth conversation.
  • The most important part of any networking event is the follow-up. Send an email to every person you met. Remind them of your conversation, provide any information you promised to share, and ask for a follow-up meeting.

The more often you attend events, the wider your circle of contacts becomes. Keep in touch with your network. Develop relationships, share information, and move forward in your career.


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Julie Batt from Quinovic Ponsonby Property Managers joins Auckland Central BoB Club – Better Business Networking


Julie Batt, Quinovic Ponsonby

 View Julie Batt profile
Ponsonby Quinovic Property Management – Specialist Residential Property Managers
Quinovic Ponsonby
Property Management
4 Blake Street
PO Box 47000
Ponsonby, Auckland
Member of the Auckland-Central BoB Club


Julie Batt

Julie Batt and husband Thomas have been involved in the residential Building industry, with a combined experience of over 45 years both in New Zealand and overseas. During this time they have also managed a small portfolio of rental properties of their own. Prior to their move to Auckland and the purchase of Quinovic Ponsonby, they were building high end residential properties in the Queenstown Lakes area.

Their attention to detail is second to none, and on purchasing Quinovic Ponsonby, this will be an added advantage, as the attributes gained in the building industry will work well with the new business, as the core principals of delivering high end expectations of clients and the need for good communication is paramount.

They look forward to meeting all current and prospective clients of Quinovic Ponsonby and delivering Quinovic core values in “care and return”.

There’s a SIM card for every single person on the planet

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There’s a SIM card for every single person on the planet
February 10, 2016 3PM Shannon Williams

New research states there’s one SIM card per person on the planet, meaning global mobile penetration has reached 100% at the end of 2015.

According to research firm Ovum, these results illustrate the phenomenal growth seen in the mobile industry over the last decade, with global mobile penetration expanding from just 33% at the end of 2005 to 100% at the end of last year.

This is not to say that everybody on the planet is mobile-connected, the company notes.

Regional disparities still exist: in Africa and developing Asian markets penetration is still low, at 82% and 79% respectively, meaning that today these regions are 10 years behind Europe and North America.

Ovum says issues of availability and affordability still need to be addressed by the overall mobile industry. Only at the end of the decade will Africa and developing Asian markets approach the 100% penetration mark, according to Ovum forecasts.

Meanwhile, machines are becoming increasingly connected: in some countries of the developed world one in 10 SIM cards are used to connect machines such as cars, electricity meters, and other objects.

On average 4% of the world’s SIM cards are used to connect machines, a ratio that Ovum expects to double to almost 8% in 2020.

“100% penetration is undoubtedly a significant milestone, but we should be mindful of a few caveats,” says Dario Talmesio, Ovum’s European practice leader.

“There are still big regional differences, and of course rural penetration in developing markets continues to lag far behind that in urban areas,” he says.

“We also need to account for machines, which are taking an increasingly significant share of the overall pie.”